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Does wood type matter?


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#21 SpeedNinja

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 02:38 PM

Wouldn't rounded edges decrease head sustain but increase shell sustain? The energy has to go somewhere...

Makes sense.

#22 Gearhead

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 02:04 AM


Wouldn't rounded edges decrease head sustain but increase shell sustain? The energy has to go somewhere...

I believe you are correct on this oneTom!


WOO HOO! THAT'S ONE IN A ROW!!!!!


:dbdrum:
Did I miss something??

#23 Augie

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 10:14 AM

We got some great responses here. Let me give another view or 2 ...

As you all know we are in a ever changing market. Things change right? Why yes, yes they do. Along with the economy that changes so do the people/companies that enter our market for our business. In the past couple of years I've watched some new companies come in and make some admirable and considerable changes to our tools. In regards to this I believe what I'm trying to convey is no more do drummers have to accept a lower grade choice for their tools. If a drummer really looks and cares in todays market they can find a professional premium wood kit at mid level costs.

What's going on in todays market? Take a look and add it up. Cost cuts are coming on some manufacturers for several reasons. Some issues include economy, availability of product, cost of producing product, cost of product, sales, success of product and more. Not only is product quality getting cut but prices are increasing every 6 months to a year depending on the company. Many companies stay faithful to inflation increases and never look back. Some companies increase product price by 3 - 10 percent annually to adjust with inflation. Bottom line is we are paying a premium price and getting less now days. Sometimes as a consumer we are lead to believe inflation is the cause of the cutbacks when at times in all actuality that may not be the whole truth but only part of it or maybe not a part at all when looking at it from a profit standpoint.

When DW's Performance kit came to market I said that's a game changer, I believe it was and is. They actually managed to bring a NA Maple kit to Market below 1800.00 US. Looks and sounds great.. All around a great deal imo however... however... looking at other companies emerging as major players the last few years in the mid level market we are seeing even more competition vying for a share of that market and making a strong, hard impact in our industry. One could argue at this point that NA Maple is no longer in a premium price range as a matter of fact, it's down well below the 2000.00 range for several manufacturers out there, some even below 1100.00 US ...

Should we settle with getting less for more cost as a consumer? Getting a few emails and pms about wood types over the years has lead me to believe drummers in the mid-level arena do certainly want the best deal they can get for the money they are shelling out. Whether it's drums or other products we buy as consumers we want to be sure we are getting the best product and the most for our money when purchasing something. Our tools are really no different imo. When consumers become what can be called compliant with changes that make them accept less for more at what point do we take notice? Again, we are seeing that in the mid-level market more than anywhere else right now I believe.

I'm not going to get into all the companies offering NA Maple at great prices I will however get into one. DC or DrumCraft. Yet another company that came into the market only a very short time ago and is grabbing a good amount of attention here in the US. I've seen first hand now several major drum stores carrying these drums.. They sound great. Top of the line 8 Series NA Maple kit for a 1050.00 US for example

Maple is considered to be one of the most beautiful tonal woods used for drum building since this instrument has been
invented. Gorgeous, delicate structure with very little “sugar” (black speckles used by the tree for nutrition storage) is what the DrumCraft wood hunters are looking for.
We’ve travelled well to find our source of the perfect Maple veneers to accomplish this task.
Rich, warm midtones, not too sharp highs and a powerful low end are delivered by the fibres and physics of this wood.
Thus it’s no big surprise that Maple is the top choice for many drummers.
DrumCraft Maple shells composed of finest hand selected North American Hard Rock maple deliver all that and more with the DrumCraft bearing edge.
6-ply Toms for pure resonance, quick response and full bodied sustain.
7-ply 5mm in thickness Bass Drums deliver low end and punch barely heard before.
8-ply 6mm in thickness Snares: warm sound with full body and a lot of attack, very versatile.



20x18" Bass Drum
12x9" Tom Drum
10x8" Tom Drum
14x12" Floor Tom
14x5" Snare Drum

drumcraft1.jpg

And for the Birch fans

DrumCraft Toms and Bass Drums are made of seven plies of the finest A-Grade South Siberian birch carefully selected from our wood specialists.



Now in all honesty after hearing these drums and seeing them for that price there is no way I would consider as a consumer spending 2-300 less on anything else when I could get a DC kit at that price point. The bass drum claw is really cool, has very nice lugs. Finishes are also nice. Hard to beat deal. I see DC kits having a bright market future.

It's a given some are not interested in wood types but I believe it's important to understand the market and what you get and why. This topic opens up thought in regards to the entire picture of what's happening now and in the future. What you accept now may be what holds the future, is that good or bad? Only you the consumer can dictate market.

#24 Chillihead

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 01:49 PM

Mmmm, very nice looking kit and pretty solid looking hardware.
Mapex M Birch Transparent Honey Amber R 10", 12", 13", S 14", F 16", 18", B 22".
Mapex Black Panther 14" x 5.5" Mayan Steel snare.
Mapex Black Panther 13"x6" Transparent Black Maple snare.
Mapex Falcon Single Kick.
Sabian XS20 14" Hats; 10" splash; 16", 18" crashes. AA 17" crash.
Paiste 2002 14" Hats.
Zildjian 21" Sweet Ride, 9" Zil Bel.
Gibraltar GPRSSS rack.

#25 Augie

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 02:41 PM

We can look at another drum company offering NA Maple Shells at a great price and that's Crush Drum in the Sublime Maple 400 and 420

cr2.jpg

22 x 20 Bass Drum
12 x 8 Tom
16 x 14 Floor Tom
14 x 6 Snare Drum
1 Tom Clamp

$995.00 USD Most stores

100% North American Maple Shells
6 Ply Toms
8 Ply Bass Drums
10 Ply Snare Drums
Reinforcement Rings in Toms and Bass Drums
Crush 4 Point X-Suspension Mount
2.33mm Tom Hoops
2.3mm Reverse Flange Snare Hoops
Double 45 Degree Bearing Edges on Toms
Single 45 Degree Bearing Edges on Snares
Full Round Bearing Edges on Bass Drums
Brass Snare Wires

The Sublime Tour Series is everything you need for a road-worthy Maple drumset. With 3 amazing finishes, reinforcement rings, specialized bearing edges, and varying shell plies, this kit delivers with durability and sound where it counts!
The Sublime Tour Series features shells made of 100% Maple with reinforcement rings in the toms and bass drums. The snare drums have 10 plies of maple with a single 45 degree bearing edge for a sharp attack. The bass drums feature an 8 ply shell with a rounded bearing edge for a punchy and round attack. The toms have 6 ply maple shells with dual 45 degree bearing edges for a strong attack and plenty of resonance.
The Sublime Tour Series is equipped with the Crush 4 Point X-Suspension Mount and Crush tom brackets with mating memory locks. 2.3mm tom hoops and 2.3mm reverse flange snare drum hoops ensure maximum resonance with reinforced durability. There are 3 configurations available for this kit, shown on the right.


Again, we see now below $1000.00 U.S.D. for real 100 percent NA Maple kits. At that kind of price it's hard to ignore what you could have instead of not have at only very little more $$$

#26 Gearhead

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 05:05 PM

Huh...interesting. The Sleishmans I have been talking about also offer their Omega series with NA maple, for a little more cost but not a whole lot. I wonder if all NA maple is created equal, or if there is some NA maple that is much more similar to Asian maple in quality?
Did I miss something??

#27 claydoh

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 08:03 PM

interesting topic Augie Dog!, personally I think the drum manufacturers list the wood types and exotics on the high end kits is to "justify" to us the consumer for the price they are asking! one of the main reasons for me staying with the Mapex brand over the last 15 years is the fact that they are,(Pro-M's,Mars Pro's) all maple shells!,Asian or American? I assume Asian!,funny how the higher end and exotic kits are thinner shells,so less material,even though higher wood quality,yet the outer ply with its gorgeous grain of Maple,bubinga,burl or what not is what your paying for?? unless you order a kit made of dinosaur wood thats been in lake Michigan for the last 500 years!! Again,we learned on a piece of shit kit, that had good heads and was tuned well! I have heard pro drummers on crappy drums that sound awesome and pro drummers on top-o--the-line kits that sound just God awful!! also in response to speed ninjas comment on vintage drums and no mid/entry levels, I dissagree, my 80's Premier "Royale" kit is plies of birch and eucyliptus, not sure which the outer stained ply is?,looks like oak,I guess its birch, but they never have sounded great, but they are pretty!
Mars pro 5 pc marina blue,Pro-m 5 pc caramel fade,Premier Royale 7 pc Chestnut., Ludwig,Slingerland,Gretsch,Noble&Cooley, Premier & Mapex snares, Zildjian A's,K's', china high, A's Quick Beats HH

#28 SpeedNinja

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 10:19 PM

also in response to speed ninjas comment on vintage drums and no mid/entry levels, I dissagree, my 80's Premier "Royale" kit is plies of birch and eucyliptus, not sure which the outer stained ply is?,looks like oak,I guess its birch, but they never have sounded great, but they are pretty!

When I say vintage, I mean something that's really vintage. 1980s isn't vintage, just old.




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