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OfficialDrummer

Your 2018 , tell us about it!

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2018 is right around the corner, tell us your plans, expectations and more for 2018.

For me, 2018 holds a lot of un-certainty but I have managed a few constants here. 
1. Lots of house stuff to do and build. I completed my back deck about 2 years ago, so now it's time for a front deck (little smaller this time)
2. More family time, less pc/developing time. I have after 3 years gotten my theme business pretty well set-up and running. With the themes I sell done now and only little updates to worry about I can spend more time checking emails for sales than developing a product.
3. More practice time. I barely got to play in 2017 due to the theme business.

So there's a few from me, what about you?

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1. Punch the impact window contractor in the gonads if they don't finish the windows immediately and pass re-inspection so I can finish renovating half the house by March.
2. Play more drums, possibly including a low key YouTube channel.
3. I came up with a Twitter handle a couple years ago and people really liked it.  I've been meaning to turn that into something and have been building an online following for it.  Maybe I can take it a step further with  a website and merch store in 2018, which is what people initially said I should do with it.  I'm still working on a logo.  Concept is in my head, I just have to draw it.
4. Start going to car meets again.
5. Go to the gun/archery range at least once every 2 months.

There's a lot more I need to do next year, but that's what I've organized in my head so far, or what's left over from 2017.

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1. Finish the renovation

2. Hopefully find a last place to hang our hats that doesn't need to be totally redone. (I don't hold out much hope for that).

3. If we don't find a place by March first I'm going ahead with plans to build an office/music building.

4. Get some recording software and learn how to use it.

5. Make these stacked plywood drums I've been working around for a year now.

6. Start a business. Something involving wood and open air sales, like flea markets and what they call Trade Days here in NE TX.

7. Keep a close watch on the economy because the current tax overhaul is not going to stop the freight train about to hit us.

8. Lose weight.

9. I'll think of something.

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1.  Get published

2.   Make someone extremely important to me as happy as they deserve

3.  Start life over

4.  Move to Tiburon, CA

5. Have normal blood pressure

6. Pick up my sticks with passion again

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14 hours ago, SpinaDude said:

1.  Get published

2.   Make someone extremely important to me as happy as they deserve

3.  Start life over

4.  Move to Tiburon, CA

5. Have normal blood pressure

6. Pick up my sticks with passion again

 What do you write?

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I'm a novelist, DieHard.  I've finished two books and am working to finish my third.  I have interest from one party, not just for publishing, but it's all part of a much larger potential deal so it's taking quite a long time to work through.  Please don;t take that to mean a deal is imminent.  Far from it.  Right now it's a total fifty-fifty chance they'll bite, possibly not even quite that strong of a chance considering I'm an unknown with no track record to support me.  It could crumble to dust at any moment.  But there's still hope.  And when it finally does happen (if not with them then with someone else, I've worked too long and hard to let it fall apart) that will give me what I need to start over after a life changing 2017.  

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Spiny, what's your genre?

I have always loved to write, though I only tried to have one thing published. Didn't work out. It isn't a passion so, I don't pursue it. Some years back I wrote some articles for a Christian magazine, and tracts and things. Otherwise it's just personal stuff I write on my site or whatever, about drumming and music.  Oddly enough, I don't read much. I've always been a slow reader and with symptoms of stuff I'm dealing with now, reading is even more difficult; to stay focused and all.

With all the tech now, writing seems lost in the age. I don't see near as many book stores around like I used to. Even some of the giant ones have closed their doors. It must a a lot more difficult to find a publisher today than just a few years back. I actually find writing pretty therapeutic.  Takes away some stress.

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I write sci-fi adventure.  I'm finishing the first of a three book series now.  I didn't intend for it to be a trilogy, that's such a tired cliche, but the nature and demands of the story pushed it that way.

I really love writing, it's incredibly exciting to craft something from nothing but imagination and grit, creating people and worlds you hope no one has ever seen before.  I'm eager to get them out there to be shared.  

It's also therapeutic as you said, DieHard.  It's very strange how life has imitated art in my case as I structured the narrative for the main character.  Thank God despite the ups and downs he has a pretty happy ending.

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8 hours ago, SpinaDude said:

I write sci-fi adventure.  I'm finishing the first of a three book series now.  I didn't intend for it to be a trilogy, that's such a tired cliche, but the nature and demands of the story pushed it that way.

I really love writing, it's incredibly exciting to craft something from nothing but imagination and grit, creating people and worlds you hope no one has ever seen before.  I'm eager to get them out there to be shared.  

It's also therapeutic as you said, DieHard.  It's very strange how life has imitated art in my case as I structured the narrative for the main character.  Thank God despite the ups and downs he has a pretty happy ending.

Is it difficult to write sci-fi when so much tech has produced all the imagery it has in the last few decades? I imagine you really have to concentrate on strong characters and story line. Or maybe it's easier to write out something and have the reader's own imagination take over rather than seeing someone elses imagination on screen.

Good fortune to you with this project.

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(I just re-read through this and realized it's a bit scattershot in that I jump from one idea to the next, but I'm too tired to modify it.  :neutral:

Everything I do is character focused and based.  That's the real STORY.  The PLOT revolves around the sci-fi conventions.  If you don't care about what happens to the characters, the plot can still be followed through but it becomes sterile.  No one gives a shit, including the author.   That's what's made the Marvel Cinematic Universe so successful, they invest in character and interpersonal dynamics first, then move onto the rest.  The original Star Trek show did it wonderfully, as did Amblin in the 80's and Battlestar Galactica in the early 2000's.  As far as the visuals go, I was (still am in most respects) a film student and I see most things from the mindset of an editor.  It's all about pacing, rhythm and cadence.  An action sequence needs to be (at least for me) timed out on paper, so that as the author I draw your eye to the exact thing I want you to see at the exact time I want you to see it, creating, in effect, a film cut, or a rhythmic placing of elements within the frame. If you're doing comedy on film it has to be shot and cut in just a certain way to make it land.  The timing is everything.  So you have to "cut" that timing at the keyboard.  And every joke is different.  It's like punctuating with a crash...do you want to stress the same high as the rest of the band, or do you want to create your own accent off the beat when someone;s not expecting it.  One hard trick is building something using the familiar tropes and, while not quite turning them on their heads, still turning them about just enough that they're fresh to a mass audience.  Throwing someone we can relate to into that mix helps bridge the fantastic back to your audience.  In the meantime you need to make it emotionally complex enough, deep enough without being overwhelming, that it rings true as a real person, not just a surface glaze of characterization.  Compare the lived in characters of Alien, E.T., Blade Runner, Star Trek II, Goodfellas, Jaws, The Lord of the Rings and compare them to the character glaze (meaning all surface but nothing within) Independence Day, The Rock, Transformers or Avatar.  I don't care how great they could have made the shark look in Jaws if they made it today...NOTHING will ever stand up Quint's speeches...even his throwaway lines, "I saw one eat a rocking chair once," or the character dynamic in the Brody household.  Or the mayor's anchor blazer.  "I want those little paint happy bastards caught and hung up by their Buster Browns!"  As far as the visuals go, it's a question of trying to think of something no one's ever seen before, while making sure it's organic to the story.  Things need a logic to exist properly and not just look like you're throwing everything against the wall to see what sticks.  That's great in the planning stages, sift through your ideas and never throw any away because you never know when a turd can be polished into gold.  It happens.  But keep it off the final page until it's refined.  It's been inspiring to see what's been coming out in movies and TV because we've really reached the point there the sky's the limit.  Any image you can conjure in your head can now be realized in a photo-realistic way or with a more artistic and stylistic bent.  I do what I can to present something that no one has really seen before.   I've hit that a few times. I write very visually so there's plenty of visual detail and flair, though presented economically so as to not lose the reader.  Other times I've taken tropes and had fun with them, often times by making fun of them.  But even then I've managed to do that and combine it with an emotional gut punch that redefines a character and even part of the story, while clearing an obvious path for a sequel novel. 

Shit...that's a lot to read!  Sorry.  Did I answer your question? 

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